Turbo Charge the Learning Registry

Have you ever heard of the Learning Registry? I hadn’t until recently. Here’s an O’Reilly article about it from last November.

If the Learning Registry is more fully developed and populated with content, students and teachers all over the U.S. will have easy access to all the best online resources that map to any of the Common Core State Standards for education. Actually, the Learning Registry is not limited to common core and I suppose it isn’t limited to K-12 either. Any educational content (free or premium) can be added to the Learning Registry. Think of it as a universal card catalog to all online education content, with community ratings on the quality of the resource.

One way to see how this could work is to imagine an effort to organize all the thousands of individual teacher Pinterest boards that already list education resources: http://goo.gl/WRESh

These resources can all be connected to grade level learning objectives for Kindergarten through 12th grade, and then easily browsed by teachers and students.

(Who knew that Pinterest could play such a massive role in online education?!?!)

At a recent event in Washington, DC I had the privilege of meeting with dozens of people from education tech companies, private foundations, and others who care about improving education.

I ended up on a small task force whose project is to “Turbo Charge The Learning Registry.”Our team consists of about 15 people, including individuals from multi-billion dollar companies, philanthropic foundations, and startup Ed Tech companies. I am helping to coordinate the work on this project.

Our goal is to make the Learning Registry more well known, easier to use, easier to add resources to, and more easily integrated with other learning management systems. We want to make sure all the best online resources are added to the Learning Registry. This is going to take a lot of crowdsourcing!

We need coders to help us with various aspects of this project and community organizers to help us organize the crowdsourcing aspects of the project, and of course teachers who can help us find the best online resources (videos, slideshows, animations, and other teaching materials) and add them to the Learning Registry.

We hope the end result is a wonderful learning resource that can be used by millions of students and teachers.

If you are a 1) coder 2) community organizer, or 3) teacher who wants to help contribute to this project, please comment below and fill out our Volunteer Survey form.