All CEOs Should Blog

I’m reading Hugh Hewitt’s book Blog: Understanding the Information Revolution that is Changing Your World.

He says that every CEO should have a blog so that employees, customers,
partners, investors–everyone–can hear directly from the CEO in
his/her own voice about what is happening in the company.

I think this is a marvelous idea and am now encouraging my portfolio
CEOs to do this. I’ll report back as we learn how this helps them
communicate their vision and their ideas to people who matter to them.
It’s definitely a short-cut way to getting some constant PR and buzz
around you. I think most CEOs will never take the time to do this, but
I believe those who do will find a following and a tremendous increase
in trust and confidence, as well as some interesting “talk back” from
people who would otherwise never communicate with them.

I blog mainly because I love getting comments, emails and feedback from
other people in the world who make me smarter. It’s also rewarding to
help others by sharing knowledge and ideas, but I know I love the
feedback because I click on the comments with a great deal of
anticipation every day.

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16 Comments

  1. There is a lot of hype in blogging right now but there still is a lot of substance. I have noticed a big difference in how our customers, potential customers, clients, employees, and “walk-ins” view our company. You have to have good content for it to be a success so consider thoughtful articles related to your industry, as well as personable thoughts. A lot of people say you should only write what could show up on the NY Times, but that’s just not the case. Blogging didn’t get were it is by mimicking mass media. In fact, it’s just the opposite.

    Another note, make sure you post your blog/site url on other blogs when you leave comments. This drives better site traffic than any google listing will. Digital networking at it’s finest.

  2. There is a lot of hype in blogging right now but there still is a lot of substance. I have noticed a big difference in how our customers, potential customers, clients, employees, and “walk-ins” view our company. You have to have good content for it to be a success so consider thoughtful articles related to your industry, as well as personable thoughts. A lot of people say you should only write what could show up on the NY Times, but that’s just not the case. Blogging didn’t get were it is by mimicking mass media. In fact, it’s just the opposite.

    Another note, make sure you post your blog/site url on other blogs when you leave comments. This drives better site traffic than any google listing will. Digital networking at it’s finest.

  3. Micheal Green

    I agree. So often the communication or vision of the company is entirly different between CEO and rank and file.

    Paul, I would be interested in seeing a list of CEO’s that do blog. I know you have some listed on the right of your screen, but I would have to imagine there is a list somewhere that keeps tabs on the countries top leaders.

    Just a thought

  4. I recently read an article (I looked for it but wasn’t able to find it after a brief search) that discussed how many executives are starting to blog, but they don’t get the reasons for blogging. They’re turning their blogs into an advertising venue instead of sharing information about the company and its progress. If it’s not personal, it’s just more marketing hype from their PR department and can cause negative reponses from other bloggers. That’s certainly not what any CEO would want, so I’d suggest making sure your portofolio CEOs are aware of the need to be personable and honest in their blog entries.

  5. Dan wrote, “I’d suggest making sure your portofolio CEOs are aware of the need to be personable and honest in their blog entries.” I definitely second this emotion. In a Sarbanes Oxley world, honesty is the only policy. And if it’s not personal, it’s not a blog; it’s just marketing junk.

  6. I love the concept of sharing via blogs. But I don’t do it and don’t think I will, at least not as a president of a public company. My words have to be carefully reviewed by legal advisors and and IR consultants for my protection, protection of the company and our investors. There is so much going on that simply can’t be spoken of publicly without having disclosure problems. Even after careful reviews there sometimes are problems that go unoticed until the phone calls start coming in. Unfortuntely everything has to be analyed for how different parties may interpret statements. It goes far beyond just being honest. In the public world a blog will never be what it can be in the private world. In the end I support blogs, but strongly suggest you think before you blog. — Kirk

  7. I love your posting. Great! But what about legal aspects? If you are a stock-listed company things are a bit more complex. What do you think?

  8. Franklin Covey surveyed many organizations and found that if you ask the average worker how his work aligns with organization objectives, he / she can’t tell you. Why? Precisely because CEO’s message gets “massaged”, interpreted or even sabotaged as it goes down the line. Technology and blogs are making our workplaces more democratic. Fox News say, “We report, you decide.” But the workplace is different. The CEO should facilitate the dicussion, and then let the collective knowledge and experience of all workers test the idea, initiative, or action plan. The best ideas will surface, and should be put to use since they will have the greatest “buy in”. Major strategic decisions can’t simply be announced. This article from Business Week, “Blogs will change your Business” has interesting implications. See http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_18/b3931001_mz001.htm

  9. […] While there are no universal laws about who should blog for an organisation. Although many critics suggest that CEOs should blogfor the company, but I believe employees who are highly identifiable by an organisation should blog. You might wonder who are the top bloggers in external corporate blogging. Here is a list of top rated corporate bloggers. Try having a look into their blogs and guess what made these blogs so special in the blogosphere. […]

  10. […] of top corporate bloggers April 22, 2007 Posted by moinul in Uncategorized. trackback While there are no universal laws about who should blog for an organisation. Although many criticssuggest that CEOs should blog for the company, but I believe employees who are highly identifiable by an organisation should blog. You might wonder who are the top bloggers in external corporate blogging. Here is a list of top rated corporate bloggers. Try having a look into their blogs and guess what made these blogs so special in the blogosphere. […]

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