The long term cumulative impact of guerilla marketing

In December a panel of internet entrepreneurs shared their stories and their keys to success with my BYU marketing and Provo Labs Academy students.

One young woman told how she had teamed up a few years ago with her brother to start an ecommerce site, selling a very unusual niche product. They did almost $1 million in revenue last year.

One student asked her how long it took for her sales to take off initially. Her answer surprised me: she worked for an entire week before she had her first sale.

How many people would work a full week, generate one sale (probably under $30) and still be willing to stick with it? Yes she worked for a full year before generating enough sales were to pay her a living wage.

Now, after many years of hard work, she and her brother are doing very well.

Her story reminds me how important it is to be patient and persistent with your online business. Online businesses almost always start with a small trickle of visitors, a few sales, and then over time turn into a stream of traffic and a river of repeat customers — but only if the founding team keeps at it.

Even eBay started this way. When the auction site was first launched, a small number of checks started coming in. The stream of checks turned into a torrent, all while Pierre Omidyar was working at General Magic in his cubicle. EBay was profitable from the beginning, because
there was really no overhead and the site was incredibly viral and revenue ramped quickly.

But most of the ecommerce sites listed in the Internet Retailer Top 500 (it takes more than $3 million in annual sales to make that list) probably started much more slowly than eBay. But their teams kept promoting their products, they kept at it, until revenue reached the millions.

The most important book I had when starting all of Ancestry.com and MyFamily.com’s marketing efforts was Guerilla Marketing Online Weapons: 100 Low-cost High Impact Weapons for Online Prosperity.

A lot of the tactics are now obsolete, but it is the mindset that matters the most. It’s a rare mindset but a really valuable one.

As my World Vital Records team watches our small stream of visitors grow, I want to remind them how important it is to market our company’s products at every opportunity, in every possible channel, using every possible tactic.

As our marketing team grows, I want every one of them to understand the power of guerilla marketing compounded over time.

Let’s do the math.

Suppose you hire a marketing employee at $10 per hour, and assign her to do guerilla marketing and PR using dozens of online marketing tactics. There are literally hundreds of legitimate tactics.

Let’s say that her first day she gets a link from another site that will consistently deliver 3 visitors per day from now on. This could be a link on a blog roll, or an entry in a web directory, or a link on any other site.

Not a very successful day, right. In eight hours, she cost $80, and delivered 3 visitors and no sales.

With an average conversion rate of 2% and an average sale price of $50, the marketing employee failed on day one. Result: loss of $80.

But imagine that she works every day using guerilla tactics such as posting answers to questions on Yahoo Answers, appropriately advertising on Craigslist, submitting her site to search engines and directories, commenting on blogs and participating in message boards, putting offers up on freebie sites, publishing press releases, syndicating articles, and asking bloggers to review her site or link to her. Let’s say her efforts bring an additional 3 visitors per day from links that are semi-permanent and will consistently generate 3 visitors per day from now on. (Many links have a long life span and therefore individually have a long tail.)

So after 30 days her links are now bringing in 90 visitors per day and generating 2 sales a day, or $100 in daily revenue.

Now all of a sudden the economics start looking really good. She’s generating $100 in sales with labor costs of $80. Depending on the cost of goods, she will soon be a profit center for the company, if she can continue focusing on these online marketing tactics and overcome boredom, and the lack of management understanding about what she is up to.

If she is creative enough to keep finding new ways to get permanent links from other sites that will consistently deliver 3 new visitors per day, then within a year, her efforts will be bringing about 1000 visitors per day or 20 sales per day, which would be $1000 per day, or
$30,000 per month. The second year, her results would be double.

This is how internet companies actually succeed. Ask the founders of Backcountry.com to tell you how they spent the first few years basically getting as many links from other sites as they could (even before it mattered for SEO purposes) and how over the years the cumulative impact of all these links (including from their paid affiliates) yielded tens of millions in annual revenues.

This is how it works. There are employees in every successful internet company (usually underappreciated) who are in the trenches every day, gutting it out, getting a link here and a mention here, and an affiliate here, finding webmasters or bloggers or journalists anywhere who might take an interest in their products, writing new content, finding new keywords to market around, generating some sales and some positive word of mouth, until the cumulative impact of all their efforts is generating a consistent daily stream of sales.

Since most corporate executives (unless they were there from the start) have no idea how this stuff actually happens, they don’t give much credit to the trench workers (such as when Ancestry.com laid off its only affiliate manager back in 2000 when she was merely responsible for personally recruiting 9 of the top 10 affiliates, and generating, at one point, a very significant percentage of the companies new daily sales), and they stop investing in the daily guerilla and online marketing tactics that have this cumulative impact.

When their businesses seem to plateau or peak, they panic and spend more and more dollars on paid marketing, and the guerilla stuff goes by the way side.

You can still be profitable when you are spending money to get every visitor to your web site, but not nearly as profitable as when you use a nice combination of paid marketing, guerilla and viral.

For me and my team at World Vital Records (and genealogy is extremely diverse and viral, so we have a lot of opportunities to spread the word in creative ways) the question is this: how many employees like the one I described above can we find, train, and support, before they are duplicating efforts and stepping on each other’s toes.

If our market can handle one such employee, and she can generate links every day that will bring us 3 clicks per day from now on, then in a year, we’ll have one employee generating the $1,000 per day that I described above.

But if there are enough tactics involving enough web sites from enough countries and we can have 10 employees doing this guerilla marketing stuff, then at the end of a year, this team will be generating $10,000 per day in revenue. That would be better: a $3.65 million annual revenue stream from our guerilla marketing/affiliate marketing team. But what if we could support 20 such employees, or eventually 50. The numbers start looking very good.

And it all starts with just 3 visitors a day.

PS. I just thought of a new metric for guerilla marketing. We all use unique visitors, unique visits, page views, and sales. But what about this: unique daily referring domains. I wonder if anyone has ever used that.

A guerilla marketer or a team of them could keep track (this would be an easy report in Omniture) of the number of unique domains or unique URLs that brought at least one visitor each day. If the team is doing their job and getting enough attention and links from other sites, this number would grow every day. This would indicate how horizontal their efforts.

Of course a good online or guerilla marketer will try to get prominent links on high traffic web sites that will generate hundreds or thousands of visitors per day; but my point is that you don’t have to have huge wins like this to succeed–you can do it with small wins every day over a long period of time.

New Genealogy Affiliate Program Launches

World Vital Records officially launched its affiliate program this week with the most generous commissions in the genealogy industry.

I believe we are the first genealogy company to offer recurring revenue for affiliates when a subscriber renews their subscription. I know that many genealogy affiliates have wanted this for a long time.

Here are the details from Brad Pace, who manages our new genealogy affiliate program.

Program details:

* Earn a 30% commission on every membership plan
* Send more than 25 members a month and your commissions go up to 40% for every membership plan
* Earn a 10% commission on ALL recurring membership plans for any member you refer!
* 60 day cookie duration
* Commission checks paid very next month after commission is received
* Easily link to any page or search result on our site
* Affiliate API to add functionality to your site (COMING SOON)
* Tons of great articles and content to add to your site (COMING SOON)
* World class affiliate tracking through MyAffiliateProgram

SPECIAL LAUNCH OFFER! Help us launch our program. All affiliate sales in January 2007 will receive 50% commission! So got to http://www.worldvitalrecords.com/affiliates/default.aspx and signup today.

Brad would love to personally speak with you. Please feel free to call him with any questions at 801-653-5977, starting on Tuesday. (He is taking today — January 12th — off and Monday is a holiday.) You can also email him at brad “AT” worldvitalrecords.com.

Do you need something to promote WVR on your site? He will build any custom images and will attempt to get you any content you may need. Just let him know what you need.

There are tens of thousands of genealogy sites that belong to affiliate programs. We hope that many of them will give us a try. We will do our very best to be a great partner for them.

In 1998 when I learned about affiliate marketing and decided to create the first affiliate program in the genealogy industry at Ancestry.com, our affiliate managers recruited affiliates simply by doing searches on popular search engines, finding genealogy sites that came up, and trying to contact the owners. It was a tedious process.

I remember how much the affiliates loved Amy Roberts, our first affiliate manager. She recruited 9 of the top 10 affiliates that we had at Ancestry.com. (I haven’t worked there since February 2002). Many of them were able to quit their full-time jobs and live on the income that they generated from their web site–which, by the way, they all started as a labor of love and not as a way to make money.

Today, you can use a crawler to visit thousands of web sites very easily, and scan the pages looking for code that indicates someone is already an affiliate for another genealogy company. Knowing the domain, you can do an automatic who-is lookup or crawl the site looking for “Contact Us” type info. Then a personal email contact or phone call can let them know about the new opportunity.

It’s so much easier to build a successful affiliate program today than it was 8 years ago. And the most recent statistics I’ve seen are that most successful ecommerce sites generate between 10-20% of their revenue from their affiliate marketing program.

While I was at 10x Marketing, we crawled the top 10,000 web sites in the U.S. and determined if they had ever joined an affiliate network, and if so, whether they belonged to the Be Free, LinkShare, or Commission Junction Network. (Be Free is now part of Commission Junction.)

When we launched affiliate programs for our clients, we could easily contact the largest potential super affiliates for them. We didn’t want to waste our time with high-traffic sites who sold ads or sponsorships and who had not yet embraced affiliate marketing.

Richard Stauffer, who is our lead engineer at World Vital Records, was our engineer at 10x Marketing who wrote all the crawling tools for our affiliate recruiting effort. So we hope that within a few weeks, we’ll have thousands of active genealogy affiliates. They will be valued partners as we try to build an international genealogy company that meets the needs of millions of family historians around the world.

In the MarketingSherpa 2006 ECommerce Benchmark Study Anne Holland reports that there has been a lot of tension over the past two years between merchants and their affiliates. I’ve seen this tension in the industry for years, because for some reason, companies resent paying affiliates for generating revenue (even though they pay only straight commission) because the companies think they could generate those same sales on their own and pay less to do it.

So many companies limit their affiliates ability to use search engine marketing and email marketing. According to MarketingSherpa, many affiliates have migrated out of ecommerce to more lucrative lead generation opportunities in different industries.

I hope our World Vital Records program is the kind of program that affiliates will want to join. As Brad indicated in his email, we will provide creative and content to help our affiliates succeed. We respect our affiliates as full partners in bringing more family history researchers to our content and we are happy to pay them for finding new customers for us.

Internet Marketing Update

I’m in Hawaii on business, and don’t have time for any thoughtful posts, but here are a few items that I will be exploring more in depth later:

  • Amazon is introducing a pay-per-click network called ClickRiver. Internet marketers need to try this, but it’s in beta right now.
  • Turn.com, a venture funded CPA network is launching today at an O’Reilly Web 2.0 conference, along with 12 other companies. I will definitely ask my portfolio companies to sign up as advertisers and see how well this CPA network works. CPA stands for “cost per action”, so unlike Google where you pay per click, with Turn you pay per lead or pay per sale. Turn, in effect, will be a powerful affiliate for any ecommerce company or other web site. Turn has raised about $18 million, I think, from VCs.
  • Last week MarketingSherpa was acquired by MEC Labs which publishes MarketingExperiments.com. I’ve been telling my Provo Labs Academy members that these are the two most important newsletters for them to read. And now they are under one roof.
  • Comscore has released its first analysis of mobile phone internet access in the U.S. and Europe.
  • The Utah Jazz are 4-0, one of only 3 undefeated teams in the NBA. BYU’s football team broke into the Top 25 for the first time in years. I think they are going to run the table. The sports gods are smiling on Utah. This is turning out to be a very good year for us.

Jumping into Online Video

I wrote an article for Connect Magazine’s September issue about skating to where the puck is going, not to where it has been, and I specifically addressed online video. I encourage companies to rush into online video, to take advantage of this new trend, and gain a competitive advantage by being an early adopter.

There are so many ways to take advantage of the low cost of producing and distributing online video: marketing, PR, training, recruiting. The conversion rate of video can be much, much higher than of traditional online text or banner ads.

Yesterday at the Provo Labs open house, one of my friends told me that Current TV — the cable TV channel that plays only user generated content — is now paying producers of video content. Current uses its web site so internet users can vote on the best video segments. Then the company plays the best ones on its cable TV channel. This is a remarkable business model!

A couple months back Revenue Magazine had an excellent article written by its publisher about how affiliates are starting to use online video to increase conversion rates. That is the trend 10Speed Media is trying to lead.

It works! This past week 10Speed Media launched several test campaigns and achieved an overall result that thrilled me. Our team met yesterday and decided how our test campaign results are going to affect our strategy moving forward. The results suggest we should launch more campaigns (I think we have 35 more planned) so that we can determine which industries and merchants to focus on first.

Last week, a MarketingVOX article reported that at OMMA a panel of advertising executives agreed that 15 second online video advertisements are most effective.

Today, a press release reported on a survey of more than 2,000 consumers, which among other things explored the length of video advertisements they are willing to endure based on the size of the screen they are watching: cell phone, iPod, computer, vs. television. Here’s an excerpt.

For the first time consumer receptiveness to advertising by device and screen size was explored. Applicants were asked what the maximum length of an advertisement they

#1 Need for Startups

In May 2005 Fraser Bullock, one of Utah’s brightest lights in the financial world (formerly with Bain Capital, now runs Sorenson Capital, helped with the 2002 Olympics turn-around), spoke at the Edison Conference in Salt Lake City.

Fortunately, I had my blackberry and I took extensive notes. Here are my notes from the middle part of his talk:

Management has to be adaptable. 1990 someone brought him into run home shopping network, pre-internet. Challenge was to get consumers to buy. They had a patent. Decided they had assets, what could they build that might be of worth. Built transaction processing engine for remote banking. Sold it to Visa International in 1994.

In fast moving tech environment, if I didn’t step back every 3-6 months to fundamentally re-assess our assets and the environment, I might be missing a paradigm shift. You need the discipline to step back.

We invested in a hardware company, but we saw the asset in the software they had developed. We invested in it, but are converting it to a software company.

Ultimately we have to produce revenue. That always comes down to distribution. Our 1990 company did deal with Visa, they distributed to thousands. For new companies, it’s distriution, distribution, distribution. Must be big, fast, easy. We always asked “Where is the money.”

Long term, to succeed, we needed to have a strategic competitive advantage. What makes you different? What will make people buy this? This is essential to any company we look at.

When you are looking at changing behavior (even if your product is twice as good), inertia is your worst enemy. Sometimes you have to be 10 times as good.

Looking at the handheld X-Ray system he said he’d like to use this on teenagers to find out what is going on in his life.

Utah more and more is coming of age. To our chagrin, most of the big tech companies we’ve built here have left. But we are getting more critical mass. And there is more capital now. The overhand is astonishing. If you have good management team and a distribution strategy, the money is out there.

We need companies here, and high paying jobs.

The key takeaway from Fraser Bullock’s talk that I have been thinking about lately is his strong emphasis on distribution as the key to revenue.

Without sales and marketing distribution channels, you cannot get to revenue.

I also have notes from a Greg Warnock UVEF speech last year where he said a recent survey of 400 Utah entrepreneurs showed that the average time to revenue for a startup company is 14 months.

I think that is WAY too long. I think that if entrepreneurs would focus on distribution, they could cut the time to revenue dramatically, and find much greater chances of success.

I have a friend who made the Inc. 500 list in the 1990s, with a couple million dollars per year in annual revenue. He told me once that his revenue was tiny until he found a new distribution channel: home school conventions. Once his company found success with home school conventions, they started going to all of them and the company’s revenues jumped dramatically. If he hadn’t found this channel, no doubt the company would have folded.

So it’s all about the channel.

At Infobases, the first company I founded and ran from 1990-1997, our two primary distribution channels were LDS bookstores that sold our CD ROM products, and then over time, our house mailing list, which eventually grew to nearly 150,000 customers.

There are different channels for different products and services. Each industry is unique. Entrepreneurs need to discover all the various channels and layers of influence that affect how decisions are made.

There are retail channels, network marketing channels, direct marketing, distributors and value-added resellers (VARs).

Since 1996 I have been focused primarily on the internet as a sales and marketing channel. My favorite “internet channel” is affiliate marketing, where thousands of motivated entrepreneurs and webmasters aggressively promote your products to all their site visitors or email list subscribers.

My next favorite channel is search engine marketing, a powerful channel where every keyword you purchase or get high natural rankings for becomes a sales person working for you 24-hours a day.

I don’t know if I’m abusing Fraser Bullock’s definition of a channel by describing the internet as a channel. But I do know that many if not most of the pureplay internet companies from the mid-90s have expanded over the years to become multi-channel retailers.

Except for potential channel conflict, which can damage a company, there is little reason for a company to stay purely within one channel. Companies want to expand, and finding new channels is a great way to grow your business.

But for startup companies, finding the first channel that gets you customers and revenue is the most important thing.

One unusual source that I rely on again and again to discover potential channels for companies that I am involved in is the Directories in Print, published by Gale. I own a 2003 edition. But local university libraries often have the latest edition on the shelves.

Directories in Print is like the yellow pages, which I also sometimes use for brainstorming potential channels and strategic partners. It covers hundreds of categories and topics. And within each topic, it lists industry organizations, associations, published guides, and all kinds of directories of members and companies. It’s a great starting place to get a feel for an industry.

Next, I like to research all the periodicals and publications that cover a particular topic. The Gale Directory of Publications and Broadcast Media lists more than 11,000 periodicals, newspapers, radio, TV and cable stations. The 1994 edition listed more than 50 periodicals in the genealogy industry.

The Standard Periodical Directory lists more than 70,000 titles in 230 subject areas. Oxbridge publishes several titles including the Oxbridge Directory of Newsletters.

I don’t have copies of any of these, but I hope to get copies of many of these reference books for the Provo Labs Academy Library. For now, we’ll just prepare a directory of the most useful ones along with their call numbers in the BYU Library.

I’ve blogged before about the great need for entrepreneurs to write things down. Intellectual capital, even the name and email address of a single person whom you once met, might be the key to your finding the channel that will turn your company into a success.

The Apprentice episode a couple years ago that showed two teams competing to attract brides to a single day wedding gown sale in downtown New York City ended with one team failing miserably and the other team selling dozens of gowns to the crowd of brides-to-be that flocked to the sale. The difference? One team knew about theknot.com‘s bridal registry database; the other team did not.

The team with a channel wins over the team with no channel.

So what is the #1 need for startup companies? Find a channel that helps you find customers and generate sales. Of course as Fraser Bullock also pointed out, you have to have a great product to break into a channel, sometimes 10 times better than the competition that is already entrenched.

But some channels, like the internet, are great for new companies with new products. I encourage entrepreneurs to use sales channels like eBay to see if they can sell their product to the millions of people who shop there before investing thousands of dollars in building their own web site. I also advocate setting up stores on Yahoo and Amazon and not merely relying on your own single storefront. Take your products to where the customers are. Use all the available channels to reach the maximum number of people.

The ebook publishing company that Provo Labs recently invested in has some great online channels, including Handango and Mobipocket, with more coming soon, including a major web retailer.

The Deseret News has become a great partner for the LDS Media products. And mp3books.com is working with FranklinCovey to make its audio books more widely available to its customers.

FundingUniverse.com is using Sprout Marketing to help identify influencers in the angel investing world and also to find potential strategic partners. Strategic partners that bring you into contact with their constituents can also be considered channel partners in a broad sense — don’t just think retail channels.

So if you are a startup, think long and hard about the channels that you are going to use to get your company to profitability. Spend more time on that than you ever have before, and your chances for success will increase.

Influencing Key Influencers

While I was on vacation last week, I caught a USA Today article (I love USA Today) entitled “Using Blogs for Buzz” by Kim Hart. You can find her original article about getting bloggers to write about your product on the Washington Post web site.

When Nokia Corp. released its camera smartphone last fall, the marketing campaign cut back on news releases and flashy ads. Instead, the company sent sample products to 50 tech-savvy amateur bloggers with a passion for mobile phones.

The tactic paid off, as word spread online about the N-series phone, driving up sales and contributing to a 43 percent profit boost for Nokia last quarter.

We are thinking about a similar strategy for LDS Media. We have been considering offering full access our LDS search engine (with more than 3,300 full text books) to key influencers. There are probably hundreds of LDS bloggers who would love a free subscription. All we would ask is that whenever they quote someone, that they link back to the ldslibrary.com web site. We also want to find ways to provide subscriptions to other groups, including, for example:

    • columnists for Meridian Magazine or LDS Living
    • webmasters
    • Education Week speakers
    • Seminary teachers (there are 40,000)
    • faculty at religious educational institutions

We need thousands of influencers who are using and citing and talking about the new LDS Library web site, so that everyone in the LDS community hears about our search engine.

Question is: how do we reach them and get them full access to our web site. It might be best to start with the bloggers and give the bloggers full access if they are willing to blog about the full access offer for these other customer segments.

Another Provo Labs company is marketing a great new product to help kids do their chores without whining: it’s called Children’s Miracle Music. Last week we had record sales. But we are just doing pay-per-click and email marketing. (We will soon be using SEO, online video (through 10Speed’s online video affiliate network), and traditional affiliate marketing as well.) We haven’t yet implemented a blog-based marketing strategy.

We are seriously considering finding every major mom blog on the internet and sending each blogging mom a free copy of Children’s Miracle Music, with no strings attached, just because we know so many moms love this product and the blogging moms are going to reach a lot more people with their enthusiasm than the non-blogging moms.

What do you think?

What is the best way to use the blogosphere to start a viral campaign? What other case studies exist besides the Nokia example?
Nokia hired Comunicano Inc. to develop their blogging program. What other firms are doing this?

What would you do if you wanted to kick of a viral blogging program for your company? Would you hire a PR firm with a blogging expert, or would you do it in-house?

If you’ve tried giving away your product or service to bloggers and saw an impact from it, please share with the rest of us! (I’m adding the Nokia example to the Strategy Tree wiki’s blogging page.)

Urgent: Affiliate Marketing Manager Wanted

I need to hire an experienced affiliate marketing manager to run the LDSAudio.com program (using Directrack) and to launch one for LDSlibrary.com (probably Directrack also) and to launch and manage a Commission Junction affiliate program for mp3books.com, home of the FranklinCovey audio library, including 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. If you are interested or know someone who is, please email me at paulballen AT gmail.com.

Ancestry Ups Affiliate Commissions

I just got an email from Ancestry announcing new affiliate commission and better support for affiliates starting on August 1st. The new commissions include 5 tiers and get top affiliates up to 50% commissions. Plus, the call center now has a way to track phone calls and credit affiliates for generating the calls.

This is probably the best marketing move I have seen MyFamily.com make in the past few years. This should really motivate the top affiliates. Years ago, when I was running all the online marketing, our affiliate channel was our biggest channel and our lowest cost source of new customers. Rewarding affiliate partners with better commissions and credit for phone orders is a very good move.

Kudos to whomever championed this change in affiliate commissions!

(I hope some of the top Ancestry affiliates will comment on the changes…)

(Note: Although I founded MyFamily.com and Ancestry.com and initiated affiliate marketing there, I am currently not affiliated with MyFamily.com in any official role, and my opinions are simply private thoughts.)

While I’m blogging about MyFamily (for the first time in a long time), I might as well mention that I found it very interesting that the Seattle office is trying to hire Web 2.0 engineers for a long-overdue MyFamily site redesign. At a recent family reunion I fielded all kinds of complaints from relatives who are having problems with the current MyFamily.com site (which really hasn’t changed much in five years.) I get pretty excited when I think about what MyFamily.com could be doing with this property. It’s going to be exciting to watch. Seattle is also looking for a marketing director (for this property) that also has affiliate marketing experience. I tried to spearhead the launch of an affiliate program for MyFamily.com more than five years ago, but it never got a high priority from the company.

A Myriad of Decisions for Internet Startups

I continually get questions from students and startups such as: Which
email solution provider should I use? What is the best affiliate
program to launch? What about payment processing? What is the best
low-cost or free web analytics software?

These are tough questions for anyone to answer because most of us, even
internet veterans, have tried only a handful of solutions in each
category (email, affiliate, analytics, payment processing, etc.) and
often have deep experience with only one.

And today there are literally hundreds of available solutions, from
high-end enterprise solutions to entry-level solutions, including some
free services, and many, many open source solutions that are evolving
quickly.

In the 90s I used to rely heavily on Dr. Ralph Wilson of WilsonWeb.com.
Since 1995 he has been reviewing solutions continually and he has
helped hundreds of thousands of people find possible answers to these
questions.

Another resource that was first published in 2005 is a *must have* for
any serious internet entrepreneur, particularly one in the ecommerce
space. It’s the 2005 Guide to E-Retailing Resources published by Internet Retailer.

This guide book lists 378 retailing solutions in the following
categories: affiliate marketing, content management,
consulting/research, customer service, delivery services, e-commerce
systems, email marketing, fulfillment services, order management,
payments processing, search marketing, site search solutions, supply
chain solutions, returns processing, web analytics, web design/hosting,
and web monitoring.

It still won’t be easy to decide which solutions to try, but the Guide
often indicates how many employees or customers a particular company
has, and who some of their key customers are.

It is still hard to integrate some of these solutions, but at least you know what many of your best options are.