Free podcast upload sites

We got permission the other day to take an 8 minute audio clip from the internet radio show interview that I did last week and share it with our FamilyLink.com audience. Kory Meyerink of Family Roots Radio and I discussed our new social network for family history. They have an archived version of the interview on their web site.

Update: the 8 minute audio file is now hosted at Switchpod. Click here to listen to it.

Feel free to take a listen.

When you have audio or video assets like this, you want to get maximum distribution for them, without having to incur all the costs associated with high bandwidth.

So I took a minute to look for free podcast hosting services, where you can upload your audio clips and have them hosted somewhere else, both to save you money, and also hopefully to give you more distribution.

Odeo.com had links to Libsyn and Switchpod, and it looked like Switchpod has a great service. It starts free (with unmetered bandwidth) and then they offer hosting solutions (up to 2,000 MB of audio content, again with unmetered bandwidth, for $30 per month).

This looked good to us, so we should be able to email nearly 3,000 FamilyLink users and invite them to listen to this 7 MB audio file, without being charged for the bandwidth.

We should have that ready to go by tonight. (But I’m impatient and wanted to do this blog post before then.)

Update: the 8 minute audio file is now hosted at Switchpod. Click here to listen to it.

My question is this: what else would you do to get significant distribution of this kind of recording? Video seems to have dozens of incredibly high traffic places for uploading to. But audio? I’m not sure.

So we could take this 8 minute clip and create a video out of it that illustrates the concepts that we are discussing in it. Then we could get significant distribution on YouTube.com, Google Video, and many others, and maybe even Roots Television if they accept it.

I’ve seen individual podcasts on iTunes, but I think it is because someone wanted to start a podcast series, and after doing one, they decided to quit.

Here is the page for submitting a podcast to iTunes.

I’m even considering looking into playing this audio clip on radio stations around the country that reach our demographic: which is primarily 50 and above. Any suggestions there? I suppose that is what Google Radio lets you do–and Bid4Spots.com–but I assume they are focused on 15, 30 and 60 second spots.

What would you do? (Maybe we should send this to an NPR editor and see if they will do an interview as well…)

Online video ad spend to grow from $410 million in 2006 to $2.9 billion by 2010

From E-Commerce Times:

Spending on online video advertising will soar throughout this decade with sales predicted to break the billion dollar barrier in 2008, according to a report released this month by research aggregator eMarketer.

This year’s outlay for Net-based video ads grew more than 82 percent over 2005, to some US$410 million. The forecast for next year’s growth is even higher: 89 percent, to $775 million, prevised the report, a copy of which was obtained by the E-Commerce Times.

It showed growth peaking in 2007, but sales continuing to climb for the rest of the decade, reaching $2.9 billion by 2010.

Does anyone know if there are any upcoming conferences that will focus on online video advertising, such as how to produce and place ads effectively? Who are the individual experts (speakers, bloggers) that we should be learning from?

Grudgingly Accepting Defeat, Utah Fan Devin Thorpe Sings BYU Fight Song on YouTube

Move over, William Hung!

Utah’s own Devin Thorpe has posted a video of his incredible rendition of the BYU Cougar Fight Song.

I think you’ll enjoy Devin’s video even more if you first relive the excitement of the final seconds of the BYU victory over Utah. Check out this YouTube video that someone show from the stands.

Better still is this television broadcast video showing the final play of the game. (It has more than 15,000 views already!)

Devin has more talent than I anticipated. And he went the extra mile by travelling to Provo to shoot the video adjacent to BYU Campus. Nice effort, Devin!

Devin and I had a public challenge going about who the winner of the recent BYU-Utah Football game would be. He promised what he would do if BYU won; and I countered with a couple commitments of my own.

Thanks to the last second touchdown pass from John Beck (#2 rated NCAA passer) to Johnny Harline (see this amazing photo of Johnny on his knees waiting for the ball to arrive–as a gift from heaven) in the best BYU-Utah game of all time, Devin gets to blog about my blog every day for a week, take me to a restaurant of my choice, and upload this video.

Please visit Devin’s post and Digg it (if you aren’t a registered user of Digg.com it takes only seconds to sign up) so that more people can enjoy the singing talents of Devin Thorpe. Make it a favorite on YouTube as well. Let’s see how many thousands of people all over the world can enjoy Devin’s public humiliation.

Go Cougars!

Ourmedia vs Google; Wikipedia vs Britannica

Google announced that it will host personal video content soon, but Ourmedia.org (a non-profit) is already offering free permanent hosting of any personal audio and video content. Check out the Ourmedia.org Alexa chart showing its rapid growth.

If Google’s service is free and Ourmedia’s is free, the winner will be the one that is easiest to use or has the most features, or perhaps is best integrated into consumer habits. So the winner will likely be Google (because their usability is second to none). Google will make more money on this particular feature than Ourmedia because its ability to monetize traffic and eyeballs usings its brilliant advertising model is much greater than Ourmedia’s–therefore it is more sustainable.

It’s interesting when a non-profit or open source project becomes the most popular service in its genre. It forces commercial players to build additional value on top of the free or commoditized service in order to generate revenue. In the end, while it’s disruptive in the short term, in the long run, consumers benefit a great deal.

One of my favorite disruptions right now is Wikipedia, the open source encyclopedia which I have blogged about before. Wikipedia.org will soon become one of the top 50 most popular web site in the world soon. (It’s one week average is #80). I actually think it will hit the top 20 in the next couple of years. This site is a great gift to mankind. It already has more than 500,000 articles compared to Britannica’s 60-80,000, and thouands of improvements are made every day.

Wired Magazine posted an excellent article recently about the creators of Wikipedia–who some of top contributors are and what makes them tick.

One of the best books I have ever read is the Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary. It is a fascinating account of the 70-year history of the Oxford English Dictionary. Comparing the OED story with the making of Wikipedia shows how dramatically the internet has affected the pace of knowledge creation and organization.