My monthly post :(

I am a huge believer in blogging, and have posted before that every CEO should blog, and now I find myself both so busy as a CEO and so concerned about how my blog posts will be read, even though this is my personal blog, that I find myself overanalyzing everything I want to blog about, and usually just concluding, “I’ll just do it later.” Sometimes I learn something incredibly important and want to blog about it, but then I worry about the impact on my industry and what my competitors will do–will they act on this news before my own company does? Sometimes I want to announce great things that are happening at WorldVitalRecords.com, but then realize the PR department ought to be able to do their job without me spoiling the news. Sometimes I find some fantastic news that I want to share, but just don’t have time. Then I find myself a week or two later thinking that what I wanted to blog about is now old news, and no one will want to read my post. (One example is the Amazon Kindle which I’m very excited about. Another is the Google energy initiative which was announced today. Very cool stuff.) I’m in an anti-blog cycle, and I’ve got to break out of it.

I thought I’d start using Twitter as my mini-blog post alternative, and I’ve downloaded Twitterberry, which works great on my Blackberry, but then I don’t connect my Twitters to my paulallen.net web site, so I find myself not Twittering because only 10 or 20 people will probably see my Twitters anyway.

I think I have a couple of ideas about how to break out of this funk. First, I’d like a local developer to help me split my paulallen.net blog into three distinct blogs, but all hosted at the same site and accessible with one click. My WorldVitalRecords.com/genealogy blog posts will go into one bucket; my internet marketing/entrepreneurship posts into another; and then my personal blog posts about religion, politics, philosophy, and current events will go into a third. I’ll also integrate Twitter with my blog, and then I’ll see if I find myself Twittering more.

My blog traffic has also dropped in half this year, since I blog so infrequently, and that is another demotivator.

But, I’m posting now, and have about 10 more posts that I’d like to do in the next few days. Hopefully I will be able to muster the time and energy to do it, and to overcome the psychological barriers that I’m facing.

I noticed Mark Andreesen blogged the other day that he was taking a few days off from posting. How have other bloggers overcome the barriers that I am talking about and remained very active. Phil (Windley): how have you done it?

5 Comments

  1. Paul,
    I relate! I started supervising and training paid bloggers (for businesses) and getting paid to blog. It changed everything.
    Now my own blog gets a lot less attention. And traffic shows it. I’m doing better at building audiences elsewhere now (like on Twitter and Facebook). I do miss the response I got when I posted more frequently.
    I think your idea of splitting off the blog is good. Most of your readers probably come to read about internet marketing and over time it’s been more about genealogy.
    I’ll look for you on Twitter – I’m sure you’ll get more followers than you anticipate.
    -Janet

  2. @Paul: I think you just summarized all the reasons why I have hesitated to blog for the past two years or so.

    Like you, I decided that my business and personal life needed to be separate–and for me that meant separate blogs.

    The personal blog helps take ownership of your identity. If you provide it, it will likely be the source of information everyone uses to reference you (e.g. copy/paste quotations, photographs, etc.) vs. from a hate site or people who basically don’t know you. Will probably become more useful as you become more influential and have less time in the day per contact.

    Also, if your business thoughts are valuable, why not charge for them? That way you know who is reading and you can cater to the people who value your input. Plus, if it’s enough people, it might even be more profitable than the shelf of ideas gathering dust. I’ve seen a few subscription-only type blogs and networks cropping up lately in small niche verticals for thought leaders in their particular industries. It appears to be working well.

    I’ll help you split the blog up if you want. Shoot me an email.

  3. Ryan

    Yeah, I loved reading your posts! Your insights are great. I’m blogging because of your blog & my experience (though short) at Provo Labs Academy.

    I just started Twitter too and I’ve added it to my blog as a separate page. It’s addicting to be honest!

    I’ve been meaning to email you or ask you in one way or another…is PLAcademy still kicking? I am just partnered with a site that brought me on to revamp & market their site and was thinking about what I’d learned when I was there.

    Take care!

  4. Wilson Ng

    Hi Paul,

    I have been following your blog since 2004 when it was still on radio userland.

    I have been blogging as long as well.

    My take is :

    its not that you blog less, I think you started to blog towards genealogy and other topics which may not be as broadly interesting as before.

    Another take is I believe if you don’t have time to fill up one blog, don’t try to do three.

    best regards,

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